the workings of a writer’s mind (and from whence one gets fodder)

 

 

 

‘why I like the game of baseball’

 

 
My essay “Why I Like the Game of Baseball”

 

Roger W. Smith, “Why I Like the Game of Baseball”

 

 

is, in my humble opinion, up there with some of the best writings done on the sport. It amounts to a sort of appréciation of the game.

And to anyone who accuses me of boasting, I would say: Show me a better piece.

It has not gotten much readership. I submitted it to a couple of journals for publication without success. Recently, I started to try to get it in the hands of some well known sportswriters.

I have proofread and polished it many times, and think I have perfected it. Yet today, an inspiration for a slight addition came to me in a “tactile” fashion.

 

 

*****************************************************

 

 

I was walking in a local park. A man and a boy who looked to be a teenager were engaged in a batting practice session, the coronavirus epidemic notwithstanding.

The boy could hit! There was a screen behind him. With each pitch, he coiled himself and swung, and would launch a ball into the air that seemed to get lost. I could sense the adult, who was pitching, sort of sucking his breath in in admiration. A kid in the outfield was giving chase.

The boy had a metal bat. It was so satisfying to hear the ping each time he connected.

Right then and there, I changed the following paragraph in my baseball essay, adding the words in italics:

 

A baseball. The ball itself. Holding one in your hand. Idly tossing it. The shininess and hardness. The stitching. The delight of boys in having a new, white, shiny, unscuffed ball. The crack of a wooden bat (or the ping of a metal one) connecting with a ball and sending a fly well past the infield.

 

An auditory experience — something experiential and non-verbal — led to this tweaking of my piece.

 

 

*****************************************************

 

 

Writers derive inspiration from all sorts of places: things thought about, read, conversation, experience, and minute observation.

 

 

— Roger W. Smith

   March 26, 2020

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